On the 2018 Romanian Testing Conference

So, last week I had the pleasure of attending the 2018 edition of the Romanian Testing Conference. It was my second visit to Cluj: after having delivered a workshop at the conference last year I was invited to do another workshop for this year’s edition. I told Andrei, one of the organizers, that I would gladly accept if he:

  1. could schedule my workshop for the Thursday (Wednesday and Thursday were pre-conference workshops days, the conference itself was on the Friday), and
  2. would make it at least as good an event -and if possible, better- than last year.

Challenge mutually accepted!

During the time when the CFP was open, I sneakily submitted a proposal for a talk as well, and was quite surprised to see it accepted too. Yay! More work!

I left for Romania on Wednesday and arrived around 7 PM at the hotel Grand Italia, which again was both the place where the speakers had their rooms as well as the venue for the conference itself. I cannot stress how awesome it is to be able to pop in and out of your room before, during and after workshops and talks without having to go to another place. Need a rest? Go to your room. Forgot something? You’ll have retrieved it in minutes. Want to check if there’s anyone up for a chat and/or a drink? Just ride the elevator down.

Again, the organization went to great lengths to make us speakers and workshops hosts as comfortable as they could. Always someone around if you have questions, picking you up from and bringing you back to the airport in dedicated RTC cars (even at stupid o’clock), it is a wonderfully organized event.

Thursday – workshop day
Like last year, I hosted a workshop around API testing and automation. Where I only used REST Assured last year, I decided to give the participants a broader overview of tools by including some exercises with SoapUI, as well as a demo of Parasoft SOAtest, a commercially licensed API testing tool. Also, compared to last year, I threw in more background on the ‘why?’ and the ‘what?’ of API testing.

Me delivering my workshop

I had 30 participants (like all other workshops and the conference itself, it was sold out) and after a bumpy start, including a couple of power outages, we were off. Like with all workshops, it took me a little time to gauge the level of experience in the room and to adjust my pace accordingly, but I think I got it right pretty quickly. With several rounds of instructions > exercise > feedback, time was flying by! Breaks were plenty and before I knew it, the working part of the day was over.

We were invited to a wonderful speakers dinner in the hotel restaurant, which provided plenty of time and opportunity to catch up with those other speakers I met before, as well as to meet those that I hadn’t had the privilege to meet yet. After a day of teaching and all the impressions from dinner, I decided to be sensible and make it an early night. Mission failed, because once in my room it still took me hours to fall asleep. My brain just couldn’t shut off..

Friday – conference day
Friday morning came quickly and that meant conference day time! The programme was strong with this one.. So many good talks on the schedule. Yet, like with many conferences, I spent most of the day in the hallway track, preparing for my talk (I wasn’t on until 4 PM) as well as having a chat with speakers and attendees. For me, that’s often at least as valuable as the talks themselves.

Still, I saw three talks: first Angie Jones’ keynote (I met her a month earlier in Utrecht but had never seen her speak before), then Viktor Slavchev’s talk and finally Maria Kedemo’s keynote. All three were very good talks and I learned a lot from them, both in terms of the message they conveyed as well as their presentation style.

This day flew by too and before I knew it, it was time for my own talk. Now, I’m a decent workshop host (or so I’d like to think…) but I am not an experienced speaker, so doing a talk takes a lot out of me, both in terms of the time it takes to prepare as well as the energy I spend during the talk itself. Still, I was pretty pleased with how I did, and the feedback afterwards reflected that. Maybe I just need to do this more often…

Me during my talk

After the closing talk, which I skipped in favor of going outside, enjoying the beautiful weather and winding down, the conference was already over. To round it all off, we went out for a bite with some of the speakers before we attended the conference closing party. The organization had one final surprise in tow for me there when they gave me an award for the best workshop of the conference. Seeing the list of amazing workshops that they had on offer this year, I certainly did not expect that!

Since my flight back home left at an ungodly hour the next morning, I decided not to make it too long an evening (not everybody followed my example judging from my Twitter timeline the next morning..). Travels home were uneventful (which I consider a good thing) and suddenly, it was all over again.

My thoughts on this wonderful conference, the organization and the volunteers can be summarized by this tweet, I think:

So, did the organization deliver? Well, I did get to do my workshop on the Thursday, and I had an amazing time again, so yes, I’d say mission accomplished.

Who knows, we’ll be seeing each other there next year?

Romanian Testing Conference 2017 was a blast!

Last week I had the pleasure of taking part in the 2017 edition of the Romanian Testing Conference. I was contacted by Andrei from the organizing committee in August of last year, initially to host a workshop at what would be the first edition of a spin-off conference of the main RTC event. That conference unfortunately had to be cancelled, but Andrei from the organizing committee was kind enough to extend the invitation to this year’s edition of the original event. And what an excellent couple of days they’ve been!

Wednesday: Cluj
Wednesday saw a very early start to the day, with my alarm set at 3.45. My plane to Munich set off at 7.00, and after a quick and easy transfer I suddenly found myself in Romania! After getting into the country through customs I was faced with the first sign of how excellently organized this whole event would be: there was a car with a driver waiting for me at the arrivals hall to drive me from the airport to the hotel. I felt spoiled already!

The official RTC 2017 car

After checking in to the luxurious Grand Hotel Italia I decided to go and see the city for a bit, as this day would be the only day where I’d have a little time to do so. I’m not really a city person (I spent an afternoon in NYC and thought that was enough..) but I’m making a habit of seeing more of the area I’m visiting than just an airport, a hotel and a conference venue. Luckily, the weather was gorgeous and there’s some really good coffee stalls to be found on the streets of Cluj, so it was time well spent.

Upon returning to the hotel, I met some of the other speakers, as well as Rob, the conference chairman. The rest of the day was fairly uneventful, with dinner in my room, watching Office Space for the umpteenth time and an early night. The day had been long enough, plus I thought it might be a good idea to be fresh and well rested in the morning for my workshop.

Thursday: workshop day
Thursday was show time for me, the day of my workshop on REST Assured (mostly) and WireMock (a bit). I heard in advance that my workshop was fully booked, which meant that there were 30 people that registered for it. Normally, when I do training, I’ll try and get no more than 12-15 people, but since this was the fourth or fifth time I’d be giving this workshop and I received exactly 0 emails from attendees that had trouble completing the preparation instructions I’d sent them a couple of weeks in advance, I wasn’t too uncomfortable with that.

Attendees hard at work during my workshop

I was pleasantly surprised that all participants were fully prepared, which doesn’t happen regularly. A great start to the day, because that means no time lost setting up people’s laptops. Instead, we were able to dive into REST Assured directly. I felt the workshop went rather well, the only thing I had a bit of trouble with is getting the interaction going. People asked me enough questions one-on-one when I was walking around when they were working on the exercises I provided, but I wasn’t able to get a lot of plenary discussion going. As a result, it was a bit hard to gauge whether or not people were engaged and interested, or bored and distracted. They seemed to be happy enough with the way I delivered the workshop, though. This was reflected in the ratings I received afterwards:

Ratings for my workshop

For those of you who are interested in what I covered in the workshop, you can find all of the slides, the exercises and the answers on my GitHub page here. Feel free to review, steal and otherwise use them for your own fun and profit. Or book me to deliver it to a place near you 😉

After the workshops were over, it was time for the official speakers dinner. We took taxis to a nice restaurant (the name of it escapes me for now) and I spent a great couple meeting new people (Keith, Beren, Nicola, Elizabeth, Kamila, Viktor and so many others) and catching up with others I met before (Ard, Huib, Rick and others as well). One of the highlights of the whole event for me, even though I felt somewhat knackered after a full day of teaching. After dinner, it was time for a last couple of drinks in the hotel lobby (not a bad place to spend some time either, as you can see below) and off to bed.

The Grand Hotel Italia lobby

Friday: the conference
Because the hard part was over for me after delivering my workshop, I got to enjoy the conference day without the stress that comes with having to do a talk or anything else. This meant I could pick and attend the talks I liked, spend some time wandering around and talking to people, or just zoning out whenever I felt like it. The programme that was put together by the organizing committee was of very high quality, so most of the time there was at least one talk that was worth attending.

During the day, I enjoyed talks about finding and holding on to your passion (Santhosh), AI and Machine Learning (Cristina), introversion (Elizabeth), not talking about testing (Keith), bitter truths in test automation (Viktor, who seems to be able to read my mind), wrapping up projects and moving on (Nicola) and a closing keynote about youngsters and game testing by the awesome Harry (and yes, he’s really only 12).

All in all, another great day, but an exhausting one too. I wasn’t planning on attending the conference after party, but in the end I spent a couple of hours there anyway, talking some more to other speakers and attendees and reflecting on what was simply a wonderful event and an experience I’ll be remembering for a long time.

Saturday: back home
Unfortunately, the plane was scheduled to take off quite early on Saturday morning (my own fault!), but the flights home were uneventful and in the end I was happy to see my wife and kids again. When I’m writing this, I’m still feeling somewhat tired, but it was all more than worth it in the end.

If you’re ever considering attending (or better: speaking at) the Romanian Testing Conference yourself, I can only really recommend it. The organizing committee have put together a wonderful, high quality event and both speakers and attendees are taken care of in the best possible manner. And even though I’m trying to visit events in as many different countries as possible, I’m already considering going again next year!